education

Education Leaders Embrace Data Storytelling

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The Data Storytelling Revolution is coming to the K-12 Education world -- in its own unique way. Two days at the annual National Center for Education Statistics STATS DC Data Conference in Washington DC gave me an up-close view of how education leaders were using data to drive policy and understanding school performance. This insiders view was thanks to an invitation by our partners at the Public Consulting Group, one of the leading education consulting practices in the country.

After attending a handful of presentations and hanging out with industry experts, here are a few of my impressions:

Education leaders have a fresh energy about data visualization and data storytelling.

To start with, the conference was subtitled: “Visualizing the Future of Education through Data”. To back this up, the program featured more than a dozen presentations about how to present data to make an impact. There was good-natured laughing and self-flagellation about poor visualizations, and oooh's and aaah's at good visualizations. There was also a genuine appreciation for how important it is to “bridge the last mile” of data to reach important audiences.

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Unsurprisingly, Educators understand the need to reach and teach their data audiences.

For many of the attendees, their most important data audiences (teachers, parents, school administrators) are relative novices when it comes to interpreting data. There was a general appreciation that finding better ways to communicate of their data was paramount. The old ways of delivering long reports and clunky dashboards wasn’t going to suffice. The presenters emphasized “less is more” and the value of well-written explanations. I even ran into a solution vendor committed to building data fluency among teachers.  This sincere sensitivity to the needs of the audience isn’t always so prevalent in other industries.

Data technologies and tools take a backseat to process, people, and politics.

On August 20th and 21st, I’ll see you at the Nashville Analytics Summit. When I do, I bet we’ll be surrounded by vendors and wide-eyed attendees talking about big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Not in the Education world. After the lessons of No Child Left Behind and years of stalled and misguided data initiatives, Education knows that successful use of data starts with:

  1. Getting people to buy-in to the meaning, purpose, and value of the data;

  2. Establishing consistent processes for collecting reliable data;

  3. Navigating the political landmines required to move their projects forward.

The Education industry is more focused on building confidence in data, than in performing high-wire analytical acts.

Education has not yet found the balance between directed data stories and flexible guidance.

I sat in on a presentation by the Education Department where they shared a journalism-style data story that revealed insights about English Learners. There website was the first in a series of public explorations of their treasure-trove of data.

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On the other extreme, the NCES shared a reporting-building engine for navigating another important data set. On one extreme, a one-off static data story; on the other, a self-service report generation tool. The future is in the middle — purposeful, guided analysis complemented by customization to serve each individual viewer. The Education industry is still finding their way toward this balance.

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Every industry needs to find its own path to better use of data. It was enlightening for me to see how a portion of the K12 Education industry is evolving on this journey.

Building Bridges from Academia to Business and Practice

Hey all – we have developed a great relationship with John Stasko, Associate Chair of the School of Interactive Computing program at Georgia Tech and the General Chair of the upcoming IEEE VIS 2013 conference. As we’ve talked with John, our conversations seem to always come around to the need for a tighter connection between academia and industry. As a result, we thought it’d be great to introduce John to our tribe through a guest post. Below are just some of the ways John is working to bring academia and industry together. Enjoy! 


Hello - I’m a professor at Georgia Tech and I’ve been working in the data visualization research area for over 20 years. My friends at Juice asked me to write a short guest blog entry providing perspectives from the academic data visualization community and exploring ways to foster more industry-academia collaboration. I’ve found that we don’t work together often enough, which is too bad because each side has a lot to offer to the other.

I personally have benefited from business collaborations in many ways. Since data visualization research is so problem-driven, industrial interaction provides an excellent way to learn about current problems and data challenges. In my graduate course on information visualization student teams design and implement semester-long data visualization projects. I encourage the teams to seek out real clients with data who want to understand it better. Some of the best projects over the years have resulted from topics suggested by colleagues working in industry. Additionally, I often employ guest lecturers such as the guys at Juice to come and speak with my students and provide their own insights about creating visualization solutions for clients.

I hope that in some ways my class is benefiting industry as well and helping to train the next generation of data visualization practitioners. Students learn about all the different visualization techniques and their particular strengths and limitations. They also get hands-on practice both designing visualizations for a variety of data sets and using current “best practice” tools and systems. The course has become a key piece of the Master’s degree in Human-Computer Interaction here at GT.

Another opportunity for interaction is academic research forums such as conferences and workshops. Coming up this October in Atlanta is IEEE VIS, the premier academic meeting for data visualization research. VIS consists of three conferences: Information Visualization (InfoVis), Visual Analytics Science & Technology (VAST), and Scientific Visualization (SciVis). Last fall, the meeting garnered over 1000 attendees for the first time.  VIS is an excellent forum to learn about the state of the art in data visualization research, see the latest systems from commercial vendors, and just rub elbows with like-minded friends and colleagues.  Recent papers at VIS presented tools such as Many Eyes and D3, introduced techniques such as Wordles and edge bundling, or just pondered topics such as storytelling and evaluation.  And the meeting has much more than just research papers – It also includes numerous workshops, tutorials, panels, and posters. This year for the first time we have added an “Industrial and Government Experiences Track”. This program is designed to highlight real world experiences designing, building, deploying and evaluating data visualizations. The presentation mode for this track will be posters on display throughout the meeting with multiple focused interaction sessions. Each submission should include a 2-page abstract about the project and a draft of the poster. They are due on June 27th.  More details about the track can be found on the meeting home page.

I hope to see many of you at VIS in October here in Atlanta!